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World IP Day 2016 – Digital Creativity: Culture Reimagined

Films, TV, music, books, art, video-games – cultural works, have long crossed borders. But the internet era is transforming how consumable culture is created, distributed and enjoyed in markets that are expanding far beyond national boundaries. Ever more accessible digital technologies have swept away physical constraints, placing a world of cross-cultural collaboration at the fingertips of every artist and creator, feeding the imagination in new ways. And with this blooming of digital creativity comes the boon to the digital consumer. We read, watch and listen to the works of countless creators across the world wherever, whenever and however we want.

Reimagining culture – how we create it, how we access it, and how we finance it – is not without challenges. And the challenge of a flexible, adaptive intellectual property system is to help ensure that the artists and creative industries in our digital universe can be properly paid for their work, so they can keep creating.

New Zealand Institute of Patent Attorneys (NZIPA) and the Intellectual Property Office of New Zealand (IPONZ) will celebrate World IP Day with an entertaining and enlightening discussion with creators and experts on creativity in the digital market, including:

  • Jonathan King, film director, writer and producer. Jonathan began his screening career as writer and director of the black comedy movie BLACK SHEEP then went on to co-write, direct and produce UNDER THE MOUNTAIN; direct and produce REALITi and co-write The Tattooist; as well as writing, and directing short films and music videos.
  • Victoria Spackman, CEO of Gibson Group. The Gibson Group is a high profile, television and visitor attraction production company. They are creative storytellers working across a diverse range of media, platforms and genres. They specialise in the production of film, high-end television drama for primetime and children’s audiences along with documentary, comedy, arts and factual programming. They also produce unique visitor experiences nationally and internationally for commercial and cultural organisations.
  • Dr. Oli Wilson, musician, ethnomusicologist, senior lecturer and programme leader at the School of Music and Creative Media Production at Massey University Wellington. Oli’s main area of research concerns the impact new digital and communication technologies have on remote and indigenous communities. He has undertaken extensive research on the recording industry in Papua New Guinea, and has published on New Zealand and Australian popular music. He also plays keyboards in the iconic ”Dunedin Sound” band The Chills, and regularly performs around New Zealand and overseas.

Date: Wednesday 4 May 2016

Time: 5.30pm – 7.30pm (discussion starts at 5.45pm)

Venue: New Zealand Film and Television School, 86 Vivian Street, Wellington.

Attendance at this public event is free but RSVPs are essential due to the capacity of our venue.

RSVP via Eventfinda ( by 2 May 2016